Category Archives: Archives 5766

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Sivan 5766 – The Ins and Outs of Tznius

Sivan 5766
The Ins and Outs of Tznius…
Rabbi Aaron Tendler

 

Question #1

Lichvod Harav,
What is the halacha about wearing beige skin coloured tights? I have read in a sefer that this is forbidden but many girls do wear these tights with brown or lighter coloured outfits. I hope that you can clarify this question for me as I am very unsure of what the halacha is. Thank you very much and I look forward to hearing from you.

Thank you for your question. If it is considered accepted practice among modest Jewish women in your community to wear such tights, there is absolutely no problem at all wearing them according to Halacha. If you did see in a Sefer that it is not allowed, it must be because in the author’s community such tights are considered immodest, and therefore a violation of “Daas Yehudis”- the acceptable norm for a Jewish woman. This can be comparable to the issue of wearing denim skirts, which may be considered acceptable in one community but unacceptable in another.

Take care,
Rabbi Aaron Tendler

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Question #2
Lichvod HaRav,

I have a question about tsniut. Most blood drives accept blood from men and women at the same time. Is there a tsniut problem with a woman giving blood (which generally requires rolling up her sleeve and revealing her elbow) in front of men? Thank you.

Thank you for your important question. If it is done inconspicuously with the least amount of exposure possible, it would be permitted to donate blood in this manner.

Take care,
Rabbi Aaron Tendler

Archives

Nissan 5766 – Listening to a Friend Vent

8 Nissan 5766
Listening to a Friend Vent

Lets say a friend is angry at another friend because that girl hurt her really badly and she really needs to talk about it or she needs advice.

Is one supposed to tell her, “No, I’m sorry I can’t listen because its lashon horah”, even though she really needs to speak to someone? I never know what to do in that situation and its so hard to turn away a depressed friend who needs help but then at the same time I am listening to lashon horah. What is the correct procedure?
Thank you,
Chaya (Afikei Torah)

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Thank you for your question.

The correct thing to do would be to listen to her, but not accept what she is saying as true. In other words, you can advise her what to do as if what she was saying is true, but not really believe it yourself. Obviously, if there was some way to have her speak to someone who does not know the other person and not mention the name, that would be the best.

Take care,
Rabbi Aaron Tendler

Archives

Adar 5766 – Assorted Questions on Hilchos Shabbos

3 Adar 5766
Assorted Questions on Hilchos Shabbos


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Q. I have a shabbos coat with an extra button sewn on the inside of the coat. Is it assur to wear it on shabbos because of carrying?

A. Thank you for your question. In the opinion of Rav Moshe Fenstein Zatza”l (quoted in the Sefer Rivavos Ephraim Vol 4 Siman 87) and most Poskim, it is permitted to wear a garment on Shabbos that has an extra button sewn into it, even outside of an Eruv. Since typically this is how this kind of garment is made, we say that it is just part of the coat, and not something extra that you are carrying with it. There are Poskim who disagree, though, most notably the Debreciner Rav Zatza”l (Be’er Moshe Vol. 3 Siman 67). The accepted practice in most circles is to be lenient.

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Q. Is there a problem (in America) with mailing something on Friday because it may cause a Jew to do work on Shabbos?

A. Thank you for your question. Unless you know that your mail carrier is Jewish, this is not a problem, because we may assume that most people in the post office are not Jewish. However, there were many Gedolim who would not do so, anyway, because of the possibility of causing a fellow Jew to violate Shabbos. If you are looking for something to accept as a Chumra, I would think that this would be a viable candidate, as it demonstrates concern for our fellow Jews, and doesn’t cause anyone an inconvenience.

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Q. My mother lights candles for me on friday night, and we make early shabbos. Is it possible for me to not be yotzay with her at the time she lights, and accept shabbos at a later time even if i dont light myself?

A. Thank you for your question. I’m not sure what you mean by “lights candles for me”. Does this mean that you live at home and she lights for the entire household? If so, then you should accept Shabbos when she lights, unless it is under extremely urgen circumstances, in which case she herself could light candles and stipulate that she doesn’t acceppt Shabbos by doing so. However, if you don’t live at home, even though your mother may light an extra candle for you, as most women have a Minhag to light an extra candle for each child, this does not take care of your own obligation to light, and you yourself should do before you or your community accepts Shabbos. The fact that your mother lights a candle for you does not affect when you accept Shabbos, in this case.

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Q. What is the difference (halachically) between putting food on a blech versus on a platta on shabbos? (additionally, is there a difference whether it\’s liquid or not?)

A. Thank you for your question. There is actually no difference between a Blech and a Platta (I assume you mean an electric hot plate) on Shabbos. In both cases, something that is fully cooked and dry may be placed on top of a pot that is already on them on Shabbos, but may not be placed directly on the Blech or Platta. If it is a cold liquid that you wish to warm up, it may not be put even on top of another pot, if there is any possibility that it could get so hot that it would be Yad Soledes Bo.

Archives

Shevat 5766 – Hashavas Aveida

15 Shevat 5766
Hashavas Aveida

Lichvod HaRav,
I have a question about Hashavas Aveida as it applies to “lost and found”s. If something has been in the lost and found for a long time, can it be considered hefker for someone to take for themselves? If so, is there any specific length of time that it needs to be there before it is considered hefker?
Thank you.

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Thank you for your question. If it is something that the Mitzvah of Hashavas Aveidah applies to, i.e. we may not assume that the owner has despaired from ever finding it before you picked it up (Yiyush), a person may not consider the item Hefker and should hold onto it until Eliyahu HaNavi comes and tells them who the rightful owner is. If it is perishable, you may use it, and set aside some money to reimburse the owner when Eliyahu HaNavi comes. If, however, it is something that does not have identifying marks, or even an item that has identifying marks but was lost in an area where the majority of the inhabitants are not Jewish, there is no Mitzvah of Hashavas Aveidah and you may keep it, because the owner surely despaired from finding it before you picked it up.

Take care,
Rabbi Aaron Tendler

Archives

Kislev 5766 – Assorted Pet Shaalos

4 Kislev 5766
Assorted Pet Shaalos From Jem Sem Readers:

L’Chvod HaRav,

Q. My brother recently got a dog. We heard that there is a heter to touch your own dog on shabbos. Is this true?

A. Thank you for your question. The Gemara (Shabbos 128b) states that all animals are Muktzah, and this is quoted as the Halacha in the Shulchan Oruch, Orach Chaim 308:39. However, there is discussion among the Rishonim and among the latter day Poskim whether or not this applies to modern day pets that are kept in the home for the entertainment, and companionship of their owners. Most Poskim (Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatza”l, Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach Zatza”l, and [Yibadel L’Chaim] Rabbi Ovadia Yosef Shlit”a) are stringent regarding average household pets, but are lenient if there is a specific need, such as a seeing eye dog.

Even according to those who are stringent, an animal may be moved to alleviate its suffering, if necessary.

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Q. I have a question about caring for a dog on Shabbos. I live in a high-rise building in a city, where the only place to take the dog out (when she needs to go out) is on the street, on a leash. I’ve heard there are certain issues/restrictions for doing so, and also for cleaning up after the dog, but I’m not familiar with them. Can you advise?

A. Thank you for your question. It is permitted to allow a dog out on Shabbos , even on a leash. The only restriction regarding this is that if there is no Eruv, the leash must be held at the very end of it, and it should not be wrapped around your hand or dangling from your hand, as this is considered carrying that portion that is dangling or wrapped. Since the other side is connected to the dog, it would not be considered as if you are carrying that side. Regarding cleaning up after the dog, this would absolutely not be permitted on Shabbos if there is no Eruv. If there is an Eruv this would be permitted ONLY if failure to do so would mean that you would be unable to take the dog out to relieve itself. The dog itself should not be held or petted on Shabbos, as it is Muktzah, according to most Poskim.

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Q. Why is it prohibited on Shabbos to feed animals that don’t rely on you for food?

A. The reason this is forbidden is because it goes into the category of “unnecessary exertion” (Tircha Yiseira) that the Rabbis said should not be done, even though technically according to the laws of the Melachos of Shabbat they should be permitted. Since the animal is quite capable of foraging for food for itself, this is considered unnecessary. The reason why they forbade these things was to aid and encourage the proper atmosphere and spirit on Shabbat, similar to the laws of Muktzah. Unnecessary exercise is also forbidden for this reason.

However, as you note, a pet that relies on you may be fed on Shabbos, and should actually be fed before you yourself eat your meal.

Take care,
Rabbi Aaron Tendler